Blanco & Solís, 2014: RESTORATION OF MOUNTED ANIMALS
INTRODUCTION
Analytical samples
We present the methodology and materials
Two teeth and a fragment of a pectoral fin were
used during the restoration process of two
sampled from MNCN 44129. These samples will
mounted sharks belonging to the historical
be used for ancient DNA analysis which is a
collection (18
th century, before 1784; Bru de
standard protocol in the DNA service of the
Ramon, 1784) of the Museo Nacional de
Museum, but outside the scope of this paper.
Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC) in Madrid,
No samples were taken from MNCN 44130.
Spain. They correspond to a specimen of
Sphyrna mokarran (Great hammerhead) and a
specimen of Pristis pectinata (Smalltooth
Intervention
sawfish). These specimens are on display in a
new exhibition about biodiversity in one of the
A deworming agent using Xylacel
® (Xylacel
showrooms
of
the
Museum
and
their
España, Pontevedra;
www.xylacel.com) was
restoration was crucial for a correct exhibition
applied during a period of 24 hours to eliminate
and
preventive
conservation.
All
the
any possibility of the presence of insects,
techniques, materials and substances used for
although none were observed superficially
restoration have been as neutral, reversible
(Grafia Sales et al., 2008). A chemical cleaning
and stable as possible. Likewise, a protocol and
was performed to remove surface dust using
a condition report has been made so that the
alcohol (96%) (Val et al., 2012) and cellulose
information
gathered
may
be
used
for
dressings (see Figures 1A, 2A, 2B). Areas with
preventive conservation during exhibition and
persistent dirt were cleaned mechanically, using
subsequent storage. The entire restoration
a
scalpel
and
bamboo
scraper.
The
process has been supported by extensive
consolidation was
made with Paraloid B72
references and a photographic archive on the
(Room and Haas Co, Philadelphia, US; 7% in
two species.
acetone; Gómez-Merino et al., 2009; López-
Polín et al., 2009), applying it on the stitches,
palate and eyes. A second intervention layer
was later applied using again Paraloid B72 (7%
in acetone). An important adhesion was made
on the edge of the fins and on the stitching
METHODOLOGY
using Japanese paper and neutral polyvinilical
gum (Figures 1B, 1C, 2C, 2D). Subsequently, a
volumetric reintegration was made on the right
Previous characteristics of the specimens
eye and several areas from the stitching of
MNCN 44129 (Figures 1C, 1D) and the left eye
Sphyrna mokarran MNCN 44129 is 310 cm
and stitching and stucco of MNCN 44130
long, 87 cm wide and 70 cm deep. Pristis
(Figure 2E) using again Japanese paper and
pectinata MNCN 44130 is 350 cm long, 87cm
neutral polyvinilical gum (Vergara, 2002). Also,
wide and 55 cm deep. The specimens lack
a chromatic reintegration on the same eye and
historical tags, stand or support, but MNCN
stitchings, using acrylic paint, was performed,
44130 was mounted on two supporting metal
and finally, a protection layer was applied to
wires below the pectoral area and the left fins.
the area around the palatine with Paraloid.
The specimens were dusty because they were
exposed over long periods of time without
surface protection. No visible insect infestation
Packaging
(dermestids, termites or moths) was observed.
There were chromatic alterations (varnish
A covered truck was used for transport. As
organic rust) as well as material loss and
support structure, a wooden semi-rigid base
fragmentation on the right eye and on some
was used. A 2 cm foam layer was created to
areas of the fins of MNCN 44129 and on the left
cover the base (Figure 1E). The sharks were
eye, the teeth and some areas of the fins of
packaged using a bubble plastic and neutral
MNCN 44130.
adhesive tape (Fitzgerald, 1995).
71
Journal of Paleontological Techniques