Viegas & Benton, 2014: A CONSERVATION AND PREPARATION OVERVIEW
a
b
Figure 10: Packing the fossils; a) selection of housing boxes; b) different thicknesses and densities of Plastazote were used for
housing and padding specimens as well as for box and shelves lining.
a
b
Figure 11: Micro specimen boxes; a) single, 2cm diameter specimen box with foam sandwich; b) rows of square boxes housing
the specimen boxes in groups of 18.
acid digestion was made inside fume cupboards
and Durdham Down (Foffa et al. 2014)
and using the appropriate personal protective
materials, and later of numerous summer
equipment (PPE), so health and safety concerns
research
projects all with
peer-reviewed
were minimized. Still, it is important to point
publications in mind. Adding to this extensive
out that only trained or supervised personnel
research work done during the project, a non-
handled acid, especially in its pure form before
biased, ready-to-be-picked microfossil sub-
it was diluted, and a mandatory requirement
collection was created for future research.
for acid preparation was the use of a lab coat
and acid-resistant gloves at all times. Goggles
were not used, as all operations involving acid
were carried out within the laboratory fume
BREAKING ROCK
hoods.
Microfossils were abundant and in general were
Blocks that were too big for the existing fume
smaller than 10 mm. Two years of acid
cupboards had to be broken down into smaller,
preparation
produced
a
collection
with
more manageable pieces. This was done by
thousands of cataloged specimens that were
resorting to a variety of tools, such as medium-
the subject of Masters degree projects, based
to large-sized (125 to 400 mm) diamond rock
on the Tytherington (Van den Berg et al. 2012)
cutters, long (1 m) carbide drill bits such as the
59 Journal of Paleontological Techniques